The Pledge – I will not be part of male-only panels

The pledge

“At a public conference I won’t serve on a panel of two people or more unless there is at least one woman on the panel, not including the Chair.”

Make The Pledge

At a public conference I won’t serve on a panel of two people or more unless there is at least one woman on the panel, not including the Chair

%%your signature%%

2,410 signatures

Share this with your friends:

   

Frequently asked questions

What happens if we have tried to find women but there is nobody available?

Try harder. I’ll be happy to suggest some women who would be much better than me. You may need to organise your conference a little earlier to be sure of getting women on your panels.

What happens if a woman drops out and we end up with a men-only panel?

There are many brilliant women – please find someone else to take her place.

What if a woman drops out at very short notice?

I get it: shit happens. You could cover yourself by planning to have two women on the panel (gosh!). But if I’ve agreed to be on a panel I won’t let you down if something genuinely unforseen happens. (But if this means a male-only panel, you’ll have to forgive me in advance for the fact that I am going to tease you about this in the meeting.)

Organising conferences is hard enough already?

The Gendered Conference Campaign has some great advice for conference organisers.

What else can we do?

  • Keep drawing attention to the issue. If you are at a conference with male-only panels, call it out.
  • Audit your events and keep track of the trends
  • Be mindful about promoting women through social media

Who has taken the pledge?

Latest Signatures
2,410 Dr. Arthurine Zakama UCSF
2,409 Ms Stéphanie Beauregard Delegatus legal services
2,408 Dr. Christian Toennesen Carnstone Partners Ltd
2,407 Mr Michael Kobori Starbucks Coffee Company
2,406 Dr. Kristina Adams Waldorf University of Washington
2,405 Dr. Lesley Barron
2,404 Ms Michal Elovitz Womxns health collaborative
2,403 Dr. Geeta Swamy Duke university
2,402 Dr. Itir Erhart Istanbul Bilgi University
2,401 Mr Douglas MacDonald
2,400 Dr. Derman Başaran
2,399 Dr. Anja Eggert Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology
2,398 Ms Matias Dutto
2,397 Dr. Valerie Haugen RTI International
2,396 Miss Marije Schasfoort
2,395 Mr Maarten Derksen
2,394 Mr Ravi Kiran
2,393 Dr. Bhavik Patel University of Brighton
2,392 Mr Matt Kern Hendrix College
2,391 Mr Neeraj Jain PATH India
2,390 Ms Kaat De Corte
2,389 Ms Pooja Shahani
2,388 Dr. Lakshmana Swamy
2,387 Ms Jennie Roloff Rothman Kanda University of International Studies
2,386 Dr. Maximilian Crus
2,385 Dr. Robin Ulep University of Virginia
2,384 Dr. Wesley Kerr UCLA
2,383 Dr. Kathleen Liu UCSF
2,382 Dr. Christopher Chiu The Curbsiders
2,381 Dr. Tony Cunningham BIDMC and HMS
2,380 Dr. Frank Cacace
2,379 Dr. Mohit Harsh Washington University in St. Louis Dept of Internal Medicine
2,378 Dr. Kushal Vaishnani
2,377 Dr. Geoffrey Stetson UCSF
2,376 Dr. Charlie Wray UCSF
2,375 Dr. Ben Ferguson University of New Mexico
2,374 Dr. sharon stein
2,373 Mr Christopher Calabia Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
2,372 Ms Arundhati Ghosh Executive Director, India Foundation for the Arts
2,371 Mr Luis Vásquez Universidad Nacional de Colombia
2,370 Ms Meera Shenoy
2,369 Mr Brooke Patterson Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
2,368 Ms Ariel Delaney
2,367 Mr Prabir Borooah Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
2,366 Mr Matthew Bohan Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
2,365 Ms Jamie Zimmerman Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
2,364 Dr. MARIANA BROENS Sao Paulo State University - UNESP
2,363 Mr Jason Lamb Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
2,362 Dr. Sara Escalona Doctor
2,361 Mr Jeremiah Grossman


Another list of people who have made the same commitment: www.manpanels.org

 Coverage and Inspiration

Last year, six leading Washington think tanks presented more than 150 events on the Middle East that included not a single woman speaker. Fewer than one-quarter of all the speakers at the 232 events at those think tanks recorded in our newly compiled data-set were women.

The mysterious absence of women from Middle East policy debates – Tamara Cofman Wittes and Marc Lynch, Washington Post Money Cage, January 20th 2015

Because I believe you cannot conduct constructive discourse on international issues without the participation of women, I recently decided not to speak on any panels that did not include women. I’m not writing this to seek a pat on the back. But because any discussion that does not include women’s perspectives or that reflexively excludes or fails to seek out the women who are leaders in their fields in virtually any and every subject on this agenda will be deeply inadequate and will only compound distortions of gender bias that exist because of our long history of systematic exclusion of women’s views. I’d much rather participate in discussions where the organizers actually demonstrate that they are committed to producing the best possible work product.

“Still waiting for Davos Woman”
 by David Rothkopf, FP Magazine, January 22nd, 2015

I often attend panels or discussions dominated by men, especially in technology. This is problematic since it sends the signal that only men have the expertise in their given field. To their credit, some men are initiating change.

Three Ways To Change The Ratio of Women Receiving VC – Leah Eichler, Inc Website, November 10th 2014

There is no topic that cannot be discussed by women. There is no circumstance that would prevent one from inviting women. There is simply no rational excuse for excluding women. And, if you are invited to join a panel with no women, you must conclude it is being organized by fools.

Why I will no longer speak on all-male panels – Scott Gilmore, Macleans, October 4th, 2014

152 thoughts on “The Pledge – I will not be part of male-only panels”

  1. So many rumblings surrounding this issue, must become loud and must have awareness-raising at the heart of their goals. Attempts at gender conscious programming are weak at best, as are efforts which consider other diversity issues on panels, etc.

    This is a solid pledge. Thank you.

  2. This is a fantastic pledge, and I hope it generates real change in the way conference organizers (and all kinds of organizers!) think and plan their events. Credit to those who already do — thank you!

  3. Leah Eichler stated in Nvember 2014 that he ” often attend panels or discussions dominated by men, especially in technology. This is problematic since it sends the signal that only men have the expertise in their given field. To their credit, some men are initiating change.”

    And it is correc that gender is the balanced and equitable sharing of responsibilities between me n and women and one still don’t see how his could happe n still today without some sort of affirmative action and positive discrimination today in favor of women in many sectors where they are yet left behind .

    The Pledge advocating for more balanced meetings/panel discussions etc is certainly a good initiative to support

    With kind regards

    Hp

  4. Just a simple idea that may change our global behaviour in the near future. It should be easy to find women for panel as they are more numerous on earth than we are …
    Thank you for the initiative.

  5. Using our power to address the biases that have given us that power in the first place. I like it.

    Would you pledge to require that there be at least one female candidate for the next top job you get recruited for?

  6. Pingback: Does economics have “an Africa problem?” – By Morten Jerven | MyZeen Lifestyle Informatics - Fashion, Entertainment, Hollywood and Nollywood News

  7. Pingback: No more turnip fields! | Kate Shea Baird

  8. Pingback: Does economics have an Africa problem? | Africa - News and Analysis

  9. Pingback: La nova mobilització contra l’exclusió de la dona als mitjans catalans | Kate Shea Baird

  10. Pingback: Gender Equality in Appointments and Promotions: Two Proposals | Dov Stekel's Laboratory

  11. Pingback: La nova mobilització contra l’exclusió de la dona als mitjans catalans | Media.cat - Observatori crític dels mitjans

  12. Pingback: From Poverty to Power » Links I Liked

  13. Conor Liam Bolton

    I think it’s a great idea to encourage diversity in all public discourse, but I’m surprised and disappointed in the exclusionary language of this pledge. The posts on this site go out of their way to say that there is no subject about which women cannot speak…that is certainly very true…and that there should never be a public panel discussion without a healthy ratio of females…but when it actually declares the pledge, it says nothing about all woman panels. In the interest of true equality, shouldn’t it encourage that people abstain from any panel that excludes either gender? It is true that there is no subject that could not benefit from a woman’s perspective, but is the opposite not also true?

    1. @@ Because there are so very many all-women panels that are not about how to succeed in business despite discrimination against women. If you actually bother to look, and I don’t think you have, you’ll find that academic panels discussing women’s-studies/gender issues generally do have men on them.

      Because the women are already conscious of this issue and take it seriously.

  14. Well… that’s a good start, but you’ve set us up now for tokenism. I’d suggest bumping it to two women, Bechdel-like. You know, where the question’s whether a movie’s got two women, with names, who at any point in the  movie have a conversation without a man around, about something other than a man.

  15. Pingback: The all-male panel is horribly outdated and lame | Bain Daily

  16. Pingback: The all-male panel is horribly outdated and lame | Articulous.net

  17. Pingback: The all-male panel is horribly outdated and lame | WixTechs.com

  18. I’m in

    Andy Jones

    Radio Film

     

    and if you haven’t watched this already, powerful story from Theo Sowa  http://www.global1.youth-leader.org/2012/05/theo-sowa-at-tedxchange-africas-new-great-women%E2%80%99s-voices/

  19. Good stuff. Practical. And certain to lead to better conferences.

    I’m in.

    Ian Shapiro

    Head of Private Sector Department

    Department for International Development

     

  20. Pingback: Tumblr blog takes aim at 'manels' - Middle East Post | Middle East Post

  21. Pingback: Tumblr blog takes aim at 'manels' - US News

  22. I am in support of this – and please do sign me up – but note that an end to all-male panels doesn’t just mean proper representation of women, it means proper representation for trans people too. So I’d prefer to see this pledge worded as “At a public conference I won’t serve on a panel of two people or more unless there is at least one non-male panel member, not including the Chair.” Also, “We believe that public discourse would be improved by better representation of all genders.”

    Any chance of changing the wording in that way? It would keep the same meaning for the pledge without excluding a large swathe of people who are even more disproportionately under-represented than women at these kinds of events.

    Danny Chivers

    Author of the No-Nonsense Guide to Climate Change and the No-Nonsense Guide to Renewable Energy

  23. Pingback: Muškarac koji je prepustio svoje mjesto na panelu ženi

  24. How is this pledge being enforced? I’m at a conference not only attended, but ORGANIZED by one of the individuals on this pledge list. Opening panel – all white European men.

  25. It seems frightening to me, abandoning the meritocratic approach to debates. Shouldn’t we find the best people for the job, regardless of gender? Rather than arbitrarily deciding, that having both sexes on every panel automatically makes it better?

    1. Morty – I don’t regard this as abandoning the meritocratic approach to debates. I regard it as considering the qualities needed for the panel as a whole, rather than considering each panel member separately. Just as management teams are better when they are diverse, debates and ideas are better when they are exposed to diverse viewpoints. We will have more and better ideas when we open our debates to more diversity.

  26. Pingback: The Pledge – I will not be part of male-only panels | Owen abroad | Fatimaalkhansa فاطما

  27. Pingback: Only men at your event? This blog will shame you | Any Free Website

  28. Pingback: Only men at your event? This blog will shame you | Olivia Crellin

  29. Inclusion and gender balance, are the beginning, not the end of addressing gender inequality.

    I believe that public discourse would be improved by better representation of all genders. At a public conference I won’t serve on a panel of two people or more unless there is at least one non-male panel member, not including the Chair.

    Shane Bartlett
    Country Director
    Educat Rwanda
    http://www.educat.dk

  30. Pingback: A woman’s place is in the audience: the joy of all-male panels - News-9.comNews-9.com

  31. This is a superb idea, and I would like to sign the pledge.  Please do add my name.

    Gavin Yamey

    Professor of the Practice of Global Health & Public Policy

    Associate Director for Policy

    Duke Global Health Institute

     

  32. thanks Owen – i’m definitely in, but would also like to encourage broader diversity in all panels, discussions, workshops – everything. pale male panels need to make way for the inclusion of all voices, but particularly those who can best represent the topic at hand; and in our work, that means more voices from the global south, male and female.

    1. Peter

       

      Thanks. I agree with all of this apart from one small word: “but”.  You mean “and”, right? I can’t see any implied contradiction between what you say here and the pledge above.

       

      Owen

  33. Pingback: Because it’s 2015 | Women in Aid

  34. Pingback: 16 Ways You Can Be A Better Progressive in 2016 » SEC Primary

  35. Pingback: The Rise of the “Manel” and the Solution | Feminists 4 Social Change

  36. Pingback: Athena’s Angels halen campagne tegen mannencongressen naar Nederland | De Zesde Clan

  37. Pingback: EcoWomen :: National Organization – At the intersection of gender, outdoor recreation, and environmental leadership

  38. Pingback: Equality and Diversity in Academia: An Individual Responsibility of Care in the Face of Institutional Failure? | UK PSA Women & Politics Specialist Group

  39. Pingback: GDS and gender diversity at conferences and events | Government Digital Service

  40. Pingback: Men: It’s Time to Take a Personal Stand -

  41. Pingback: The #ManPanel problem: why are female experts still so widely ignored? – hihihi.lol

  42. Pingback: Cluelessly Excluded / Helpfully Included - Brenda Cooper at Brenda Cooper

  43. Pingback: Dude, Where Are The Women? #AllMalePanels In Global Development – AKANews – Featured Articles

  44. Pingback: Dude, Where Are The Women? #AllMalePanels In Global Development | EikAwaz.com

  45. Pingback: Dude, Where Are The Women? #AllMalePanels In Global Development

  46. Pingback: Dude, Where Are The Women? #AllMalePanels In Global Development | NewsB2

  47. Pingback: All-male panel boycott movemnet is growing in momentum — Quartz

  48. Pingback: Why I'm boycotting all-POC diversity panels | All Digitocracy

  49. Pingback: Qualified women abound, so why is your expert panel all men? - saringi

  50. Pingback: The men who are taking a stand against 'dude fests' - Castwb

  51. Pingback: The men who are taking a stand against ‘dude fests’ – National Transparency

  52. Pingback: The men who are taking a stand against 'dude fests' - Trfeed

  53. Pingback: The men who are taking a stand against 'dude fests' | Reviews News

  54. Pingback: Orang-orang yang mengambil sikap terhadap 'Bung fests' • Anshora

  55. Pingback: The men who are taking a stand against 'dude fests' - My Pakistan

  56. Pingback: The men who are taking a stand against 'dude fests' - La tienda de JM

  57. Pingback: The men who are taking a stand against 'dude fests' - ABO News Cast

  58. Pingback: The men who are taking a stand against 'dude fests' | News amet

  59. Pingback: The men who are taking a stand against ‘dude fests’ | News People Places

  60. Pingback: The men who are taking a stand against ‘dude fests’ | Naija Upgrade

  61. Pingback: How to make conferences less awful | From Poverty to Power

  62. Pingback: The men who are taking a stand against ‘dude fests’ – Football, Hockey, Basketball Club

  63. Pingback: Elevate: a Pakistani campaign for gender balance on panels – Feministani

  64. Pingback: Por qué digo que no a los paneles de solo hombres – Negocios Sostenibles

  65. Pingback: 1950'erne har ringet til Altinget - de vil gerne have deres panel tilbage - POV

  66. Pingback: #allmalepanel og Altingets ni-mands debat om Facebook - Karen Melchior

  67. Pingback: Gender Balance in Lecture Series: We are nowhere. Bartlett, Berlage, Mendrisio, ETHZ #fail, MIT, Tübingen #parity | die architektin

  68. Pingback: #PanelesSoloDeHombres en el mundo del Derecho | Enfoque Derecho | El Portal de Actualidad Jurídica de THEMIS

  69. Pingback: Event Diversity: 6 Ways to Make Your Events More Inclusive | Cameron Jones Updates

  70. Pingback: Gibt es weibliche Ökonomie? – Beyond Milchmädchen

  71. Pingback: Being bold for change - International Women's Day 2017 | Blog

  72. I think we should add that the moderator, when opening the floor for questions, gives the opportunity to woman, man, woman, man,  as too often men are asking the floor first. And also too often they don’t have a question, but they just give their own speech..

  73. Pingback: Tipping Points in Academe | Dr. Grace Kao

  74. Pingback: #SexismAV – AVNation

  75. Pingback: Where’s the (woman) expert? Practical suggestion for better media and better events | Live from Planet Paola

  76. Pingback: How to Improve Gender Diversity at Events – SAIS Global Women in Leadership

  77. Pingback: Nieuwsflash: mannen, zeg nee tegen tv-panels – Vileine.com

  78. Pingback: How Women Should Respond to All-Male Panels - IWEC Foundation

  79. Pingback: Hasta La Ideas » Blog Archive Directory of female creatives aims to tackle the "stone-aged" under-representation of women in design - Hasta La Ideas

  80. Pingback: #BeTheChange – On actually doing something about conference diversity « The Diversity Blog – SaaS, Cloud & Business Strategy

  81. Pingback: Notes from a pinkwasher, the female moderator among men

  82. Pingback: How to hire more women into technology roles | Career | US-China News

  83. Pingback: Should APSA and ISA have a “No Manels” Rule? | Duck of Minerva

  84. Pingback: Yes, economics has a problem with women | Real-World Economics Review Blog

  85. Pingback: Yes, Economics Has a Problem with Women - Evonomics

  86. Pingback: Should we boycott gated journals? | From Poverty to Power

  87. Pingback: Bella Caledonia Scotland's 5th Estate

  88. Pingback: The vicious circle of gender inequality in Economics – Development Roast

  89. Pingback: E&M Meet the EU Panel Watch: Advocating for Diverse and Inclusive Debates in EU and Beyond – Europe and Me

  90. Pingback: Sisterhood Rising: A conversation we’re not having about the energy access sector - Pollinate Energy

  91. Pingback: Op-Ed Columnist: I’m Not Quoting Enough Women – Planet News

  92. Pingback: The Sisterhood Rising: A conversation we’re not having about the energy access sector - Impakter

  93. Pingback: Extra! Extra! More Women Profs Will Be Quoted by Media! | Bostonia | BU Alumni Magazine

  94. Pingback: ‘Too many men’: Financial Times develops fembot to warn journalists of sexism – StarFeed

  95. Hi there owen.org

    But the truth is when you use this formula, it becomes REALITY almost instantly!
    Keep on reading and pay close attention to what I’m about to reveal: You don’t need a product, list, domains, website, experience, or even MONEY to do it!

    This is how SIMPLE it is:
    1. Copy a listing from location A
    2. Paste it in location B & make $20-$80 every single time… You ALWAYS keep the profit!

    ANYONE Can Do This, Even Total Noobs
    Literally anyone can pick this up, implement the same day and see Real Results of this formula working VERY FAST, without
    working hard, spending a ton of Cash!
    You’ll be successful faster than you ever though was even possible.

    Is a brand new arbitrage formula – very few people know about it and even less are actually using it.
    We focus on an overlooked area when it comes to arbitrage – and it’s pretty crazy because EVERYONE wants these services.
    Anyone that does this makes an absolute killing – and there’s no end to how many customers you can have.

    If you’ve ever tried arbitrage, you know how POWERFUL it is…
    Regular evryday people that aren’t marketers have been using it for YEARS to make a steady online income… but if you think that you know the formula we’re revealing inside THIS FORMULA – think again!

    IF YOU’RE INTERESTED, CONTACT ME ==> GetProfitOnline@mail.com

    Regards, Mendelsohn
    Norway, NA, Notodden, 3674, Villaveien 153

  96. Pingback: Pass the mic – Costa Rica to Antarctica!

  97. Pingback: Pasá el micrófono – Costa Rica to Antarctica!

  98. Pingback: The importance of parity pledges – Allia Org

  99. Pingback: The importance of parity pledges | Allia Org

  100. Pingback: Women, Gender And Think Tanks: Political Influence Network In Twitter 2018 – Analysis – Daily Health And Wealth Advisors

  101. Pingback: Why Your Diversity Initiatives Are Doomed | When Opportunity Knocks

  102. Pingback: There's More Aid Than Ever, So Why Are Poorest Nations Getting Less? - Non Profit News | Nonprofit Quarterly

  103. Pingback: Urban Planning Has a Sexism Problem | Los Angeles Flow Project L.A.

  104. Pingback: 7 steps to improving Conference Presentations - From Poverty to Power

  105. Pingback: Plenary + Panel Conferences Don’t Have to Be (So) Painful – Social Science Space

  106. Pingback: A Blueprint for Black Lives Matter in the Development Sector

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *