Casual Laborers with the WFP (World Food Program) load food rations onto a truck in the Free Port of Monrovia.
Official USMC photo by Corporal Marcus L. Miller

Transforming Humanitarian Aid with Cash Transfers: High Level Panel Report

A High Level Panel on Humanitarian Cash Transfers, which I chaired, has concluded that much more humanitarian aid should be provided as cash, rather than as vouchers or in-kind; and that this change should be used to bring about broader reforms of humanitarian aid. Read the full post »
Afghan refugee girls wait at the end of a long line of 150 residents that live in the Farah City District V Refugee Camp to receive donated items sent from the United States and delivered to the camp by the Farah Provincial Reconstruction Team Civil Affairs Team, Jan. 9. The items, including shoes, winter coats and blankets, were sorted and distributed by Abdul Khaaleq Amini, director of the Department of Refugees and Repatriation office for Farah province, with the help of two Afghan national police officers and several refugee elders who also live in the camp.

Here’s a simple way to help refugees: give them cash

Rather than giving refugees food, shelter, water and medical care, it is often better to give them cash. Read the full post »
ukaid food wfp

On World Humanitarian Day: Could We Do Better with Cash?

World Humanitarian Day is an opportunity to celebrate the courage of humanitarian workers, but also to think about how to improve the system. I am chairing a High Level Panel looking at the role of cash transfers in humanitarian aid.

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An old wooden chest on a beach

Financing for development – where the treasure is buried

We won’t get development from global and domestic “tax and spend” alone. We should be focusing more on the huge untapped wealth locked up by policies and behaviour which distort the global economy, creating massive economic, environmental, and welfare losses for most of the world’s population. Read the full post »
The Ajaokuta steel factory in 1994

How should donors work with the private sector?

We are enthusiastic about the growing interest in supporting private investment in developing countries, but it matters a lot how this is done. The tools that donor countries usually use to “crowd in” the private sector — guarantees and cheap loans — distort firms’ incentives by reducing their risks or increasing their rewards irrespective of how well they do. Donors should not pick winners. Read the full post »