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How can we raise awareness in Darfur of how much we are doing for them?

The Onion says that “the majority of people in Darfur are still unaware of how many people in America are raising awareness of the genocide there.”

Here’s the video:

I especially enjoyed the suggestions that we should start by airdropping press releases all over them, and that celebrities should have a big awareness-raising dinner in transparent tents so that the people of Darfur can stand on the perimeter, look in and see all the hard work that people are doing.

(H/T Good intents)

11 comments on “How can we raise awareness in Darfur of how much we are doing for them?”

  1. The thank you card with a child’s hand print sounds like a nice idea for a way of Darfurians to thank the celebrities.

    Important point too about increasing awareness now, before the new Batman movie takes centre stage.

  2. Is this a serious report? I simply cannot believe it. Kids for Kids has been helping children in Darfur, directly in their villages, for the past 10 years. I have seen NOTHING provided by Save Dafur IN Darfur during the whole of this time – and I have lost count how many times I have been there to see for myself. What ARE you doing to change the lives of children? Surely you must see by now that propoganda is not working. You need to do something yourself – like so many of the chidlren in America who are quietly changing children’s lives – children their own age. Please look at our website. The children in Darfur are living beyond hardship. So why are you not spending money on what really makes a difference to people? Dinners for Celebrities? I think not! Milk for a child ….. now that it something else!

  3. Dropping dollar notes on the Darfurians from C130s would be in accordance with a well-known proposal by a development guru, but I have a better idea, inspired by the well-known maxim about giving a fishing net being better than giving a fish: instead of dropping dollar notes, why not drop share certificates in Irish banks?

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Owen Barder

Owen is Senior Fellow and Director for Europe at the Center for Global Development and a Visiting Professor in Practice at the London School of Economics. Owen was a civil servant for a quarter of a century, working in Number 10, the Treasury and the Department for International Development. Owen hosts the Development Drums podcast, and is the author Running for Fitness, the book and website. Owen is on Twitter and